Yamaha FZR 600 Mods: Painting…redeemed!

I swear, it really does look good in real life...

After my horrendous experience last time with the spray painting, I was ready to leave the fairings on the shelf, and ride the damn thing naked (the bike, not the rider).  It has crossed my mind to build this Yamaha FZR 600 into a street fighter, a decision which was becoming more and more appealing, as I continued to mess up the fresh ‘rattle-can’ paint job…

Despite the problems I had last go-round, I decided it was time to get back on the horse, and try another phase of the painting.  Just before I began, a vague memory popped into my head, something about warming the cans of paint, before you begin painting.  I quickly looked this up on the internet, and low and behold, there it was in the google search….over 13 million times!  Yes, that’s right, 13,600,000 mentions of warming up the can of spray paint when the weather is cold outside.  Well, I guess a “real feel” temp of 17 degrees counts as ‘cold outside!’

I gave it a shot, putting the cans in a bowl full of luke-warm water (not too hot), and then hit the pieces that had been primed for a second time.  Bam!  Instantly the paint looked light and more like a dusting.  Exactly the way every tutorial says it should!  I felt like I jumped from using spray cans to a full-blown compressor/paint gun rig.

I quickly added a few layers, nice and light, not covering the primer completely in one coat.  It took about 3 coats, and then the pieces looked as if they had a nice dry layer of black over them, exactly the way that I had hoped.

After finishing those pieces, I moved on to the parts that already had a coat of black laid down (poorly), and had been wet sanded to even it out.  I really had to ask myself how much better these parts would have looked had I tried this trick the first time around.  For these fairings, I only dusted them lightly with 2 quick coats, just enough to cover the wet sanding scuff and dullness.  They looked pretty damn good, and I was happy to put them all away, and wait out the drying period.

I think I will end up hitting these newest pieces with 2 light coats, after a quick wet sanding, like I did the others.  Then it will be on to the clear coats, which is supposed to be a whole different set of horrors…

Stay tuned for my nightmare…

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