Quick motorcycle tail light mount…

A quick custom mount for the Mighty Fine tail light...

A quick custom mount for the Mighty Fine tail light…

I had a couple people ask whether we were shipping the Mighty Fine tail light with a mount.  The problem is, there are far too many options for us to provide just the right fit for every bike and build.  But making a mount is quick and easy…

Motorcycle Tail Light Mount on the cheap…

A custom motorcycle tail light mount starts with a blank canvas...

A custom motorcycle tail light mount starts with a blank canvas…

Just to show ONE way that it might be mounted, I cut a piece of aluminum from the stock of sheet I have lying around, and grabbed the Sharpie and a ruler.  Steel would be stronger and provide more rigidity – but just about anything can be used.  A quick check of the pre-drilled holes on the Yamaha XS400 gave me an idea of how big this motorcycle tail light mount should be.  Measure twice, cut once (and a half!), and you’re off to the races.

Sketch out the motorcycle tail light mount, and get to cutting...

Sketch out the motorcycle tail light mount, and get to cutting…

I didn’t take too long with the design because after all, it should be done quick.  A simple sketch on the metal plate, and over to the band saw for some trimming.  Biggest thing to keep in mind is the order of things.  Nothing worse than getting things shaped up, bending the metal to fit, and then realizing you forgot to drill some holes.  Make it easy on yourself, and write of a list detailing the order of things.  Saves headaches later.

the motorcycle tail light mount cut to size...

the motorcycle tail light mount cut to size…

Not sure what I was thinking on this shape – but I knew it would work for mounting to the rear fender of the XS400.  The rounded part will be tucked behind the ass-end of the tail light, so this freehand jobber will work just fine…

Holes drilled, ready for bending...

Holes drilled, ready for bending…

After the shape was cut, and the edges cleaned up on a grinder (a file would work just as well), I took it over to the bike to measure the angle of the fender.  Also got the measurements for the bolt spacing, and drilled the holes.  Once I had that down, I bent the piece in a metal brake (a hammer and vice/anvil, or just about anything hard will work here too).

You can see how it turned out in the first photo up top.  After checking it on the bike, make sure you take it back off to slap some rattle-can paint on it.  Decorate it to taste and call it a day…

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