Holidays are over…Let’s get back to wrenching!

Finally, the holidays are over.  Some may be preparing for a big New Years Eve celebration, but the focus around here has returned to wrenching, and the projects we have in store for this Winter.  Some of you may ride throughout the cold months, but many of you will be hunkering down ‘to a long winters nap rebuild.’  We would love to hear from you about what projects you will be working on this season – so that we can anticipate what we will see zipping around the streets come Spring.

At MotoPreserve, we will see work done on a 1976 CB750F, 1973 Triumph Bonneville 750, 1973 CB350, 1969 CL350 and a 1975 CL360.  All of these will be in various states of disrepair, hopefully coming out the tail end of the freeze in better shape than they started.

Send us some photos….

Some creepy spiders build a CL360…

Courtesy of the Tarantulas

We have been following the builds by the Portland crew calling themselves the Tarantulas.  Despite the terrifying title, these folks are building bikes that make us feel all warm and fuzzy inside.  Admittedly, there may be a bias toward this build, considering that we are putting together a Honda CL360 of our own right now, and the preferred working color has been green, but anyone can appreciate the detail these guys put into this build.. Read More …

Inspiration: Honda CB360 Cafe Racer

I have found some great builds on the site: Return of the Cafe Racers.  This time they had exactly what I needed to see, a gorgeous Honda CB360, done up in the “cafe” style.  My build has been stalled, because of preparations for the trip, and the trip itself, but this post shows the potential of the little Honda… Read More …

Bone up on Rake and Trail…

Courtesy of Spirit Chop Shop

With my plans for the new build, the Honda CL360, I have read about adjusting the height of the front and rear ends.  A friend mentioned that before doing any modifications, I should really brush up on the physics behind Rake and Trail.  This is something that is very important to the stability of the bike, so it made sense that I should understand as much as possible, before making any decisions. Read More …