Honda CL360: Wrenching in a Hurricane…

The Honda CL360 is being completely torn down...

The Honda CL360 is being completely torn down…

Since the Hurricane didn’t do the type of damage that was predicted, I decided to head on over to MotoPreserve to work on the Honda CL360 project… 

The Honda CL360 gets torn down…

In the past, I have stripped 2 bikes to their frames, in only about 3-4 hours each.  But those were to part out, which didn’t need to be neat, and since this project will be put back together, I figured I should take my time, and hopefully document it with some decent pictures.

The more detailed posts will be coming once this thing starts to go back together, but for now, these are some shots of the shape it is in now.  The previous owner (PO) did not exactly take good care of this bike.   The spider nests and rust are proof positive that it was stored outside, and never cleaned much.  Vermont winters can do some amazing damage to these old bikes (or any bike really!) and seems to have been the case here.

The first step in any tear down is to get yourself a box of zip lock bags and a good Sharpie marker, and make sure that you start labeling EVERYTHING you take off.  Since much of the Honda CL360 will be modified, there are tons of parts that will end up being sold or trashed.  I began putting those in a separate container, off to the side, for cleaning and eventual listing in the typical sale sites. The way it stands now, the tank, exhaust, carbs, battery, some foot pegs and rear fender, are all off the bike.  Today I will finish removing everything else, and if all goes well, remove the engine from the frame.  I need to start getting inside there to see ‘what lies beneath.’

The only real diagnostics I did before removing parts was to test the compression.  The procedure requires a compression tester, which I bought at Harbor Freight a while back, which fits perfectly into the spark plug holes.  The dial gauge on the other end of the hose measures the pressure inside the cylinder, which in this case, was quite low on the right side.  After you get a low reading, you pour about a table-spoon of motor oil into the cylinder through the spark plug hole, and do the test again.  If the numbers jump significantly, you have problems with the rings.  If the numbers do not rise too much, the valves are the culprit.

In the case of this CL360, the rings on the right (#2) piston are bad.  The compression numbers jumped from 120lbs to over 150lbs with oil.  Time for new rings….

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