Husqvarna TE610: let’s get dirty…

The Husqvarna TE610 is the first dirt bike at MotoPreserve...

The Husqvarna TE610 is the first dirt bike at MotoPreserve…

While the majority of motorcycles at MotoPreserve are vintage, there are a few oddities popping up lately.  Slowly, a couple more modern bikes have made their way into the ranks, and the latest is the 2009 Husqvarna TE610…

Husqvarna TE610: back to the woods…

The Husqvarna TE610 strikes a modern, aggressive pose...

The Husqvarna TE610 strikes a modern, aggressive pose…

Husqvarna began it’s motorcycle manufacturing like many companies, first developing bicycles, then making the leap to motorized bikes in 1903.  Based in Husqvarna, Sweden, the company finally opened it’s engine factory in 1920, developing a 550cc V-Twin.

The Husqvarna TE610 was my first foray back into dirt riding.  It’s been over 20 years since I got dirty (real dirt, not road grime) on a motorcycle, and I’m looking forward to the experience.  For the years it was manufactured, the Husqvarna TE610 was touted as the best dual sport, in a class with some much-loved bikes such as: Kawasaki KLR, Suzuki DR and DRZ, and of course the loved/hated KTM line of dual-sports.  While this bike is by no means pitted against the BMW line of GS bikes, the Husqvarna company was recently purchased by BMW Motorrad.

What people seemed to love so much about this bike was the fact that its dirt skills derived from the Husqvarna lineage of motocross and supermoto racing bikes.  Many dual-sport motorcycles are far better on the road than off, making this model a nice choice if you really want to experience fire roads, single track and even MX courses if you’re bold.

When I bought the bike, many of the common mods had been done already, leaving few things to change – and making it a great bike to ride, straight out of the gate.  There are a few improvements and maintenance checks that will be done, but so far, it’s been a blast to ride around town.  The long-throw suspension has been a welcomed change on the cities pock-marked streets, and I am looking forward to getting this thing off the pavement, and into the woods.

Rattle-can black makes the bike look a bit meaner...

Rattle-can black makes the bike look a bit meaner…

The first thing I did, after riding it for about a week, is paint the spare plastic fairings that the previous owner included in the sale.  The stock red was a bit much, and a quick rattle can job blacked out the look of the bike.  Still need to get the front fairing, which is part of the headlight mold, and the front fender.  But the photo above shows the new look as it stands.

Stay tuned for more details and some performance mods…

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