Bryan Fuller Redeems Himself…

Last we heard from Bryan Fuller, he was being slammed in the online press for chopping up a coveted, vintage Honda.  OK, I don’t think I was as harsh about the Bryan Fuller build as many people on the interwebs were, but I did find it a little weird to go hacking up a fairly sweet 1969 Sandcast CB750.  Today I stumbled upon the videos put out under the moniker of 2 Guys Garage, and they have some great clips and How-Tos.  Apparently, Fuller doesn’t only attack coveted Honda’s, they also take more “appropriate” bikes, and turn them into pieces of art… Read More …

Cafe Racer TV redeem themselves…

Back in the day...

After the debacle with the build by Hot Rod wunderkind Bryan Fuller, Cafe Racer TV redeemed themselves with a great expose on the 59 Club, the group that was, and still is, responsible for the cafe racer movement’s longevity. The club was started in England by a pastor, “Father Bill,” in 1962, as a place for kids, particularly motorcycle enthusiasts, to congregate and be safe. Mostly, it seems it was started so these kids and a place to go, one they could call their own.

The club still continues to this day, and the segment highlights some great memories, from the folks that were there at the time.

Why do you chop a perfect CB750? Apparently, for Chicks!

So, I finally got around to watching the newest episode of Cafe Racer TV, which provided the follow-up to the (some say) tragic chopping of a 1969 “sandcast” CB750, by Hot Rod builder Bryan Fuller. For those who have not been following along, the sandcast models, made in the very first part of 1969, are roughly the first 7000 CB750s to roll out of the Honda Shop. These are considered the very first “super bike,” producing 67 HP, which was an outstanding feat for a production model. Sand Casting refers to the method that the cases were forged, before the factory would switch to typical die casting in late 1969. Along with some other unique features (wrinkle tank, gauges etc), these bikes are considered the creme de la creme of the CB series, and arguably one of the most sought after vintage bikes.

Along comes Cafe Racer TV, the show dedicated to furthering this genre of motorcycle in the public’s conscience. But, if the backlash on the internet has anything to say about it, choosing this particular coveted bike, and chopping it to hell, with the original owner looking on, was a big no-no. In fact, the uproar created by the segment could be seen far and wide, on such forums as Do The Ton, SOHC-4, and even in interviews with other builders, on the Cafe Racer TV episode that highlighted the initial hacking.

Fast forward to this newest episode, which happens to air a segment of the interview with Bryan Fuller, when he states that a girl seeing you pull up on a stock CB750 would probably not think there was anything bad-ass about you, but if she saw you pull up on the custom chop he ended up with, you might be able to get her to go out on a date.

Hmmmm. I was hoping this debate would die down a tad, after the episode aired, showing the beautiful work he was able to carry out with this amazing CB 750 as a backbone. Alas, that ship sailed with this latest comment, in a string of doozies…

Cafe Racer TV staged an attack?

Yesterday I posted about the season two premiere of Cafe Racer TV, and the opening segment, detailing the customization of a certain coveted bike.  Turns out, the brouhaha they created with Bryan Fuller’s chop of a 1969 CB750 hit a nerve, and the internet motorcycle community was buzzing, with rancor for the builder, and the show in general.  A few people came to the defense of Fuller, mostly people who have a personal relationship with him, and know and respect his talents and intentions.

The drama escalated when people started posting about their inside knowledge of this particular build, stating that many of the more egregious acts were staged for the cameras.  The most offensive seemed to be the actual “attack,” and chopping of the frame.  I have to admit, there was a certain sense of brutal bravado when Fuller’s assistant were filmed bashing away at parts that didn’t come apart easily.  But in the end, it seems that the producers of Cafe Racer TV, and not Bryan Fuller, were the ones who should be the focus of all this rage.  Apparently, they may have opted for the ratings instead of genuine builds with integrity.

As I mentioned yesterday, I don’t have any strong opinions either way.  I recognize that every builder has the right to do as he/she wishes with their bikes.  It just seemed like a cheap trick to choose to chop a bike that would have happily gone to a new home, and in turn, fund any build Fuller had in mind.  But what’s done is done, and love it or hate it, I think the episode will prove beneficial for the show.  As they say, “any press is good press.”